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Craig Groeschel said recently in a podcast that culture eats strategy for breakfast.

If this is true, and I believe every successful organization would say yes, then what should our culture be like?

What values should our organization or church hold to so that we have a good culture?

Every church has different things that make them who they are, and I want to unveil the curtain of the church that I am a part of.

So, here are four values of the connections team (hospitality team):

1. Everything Speaks

One value that we communicate to every connections team member at our church is that everything communicates something to the guest walking through our doors.

The friendliness or unfriendliness of our staff communicates something. The cleanliness of our facility communicates something. The signage communicates something. Everything communicates.

We all are fans of Disney World. Let’s just be honest, every church wishes that it had culture like Disney.

When Walt Disney was opening Disneyland, his wife asked him why he would open an amusement park, because they are so dirty. Walt responded, “that is the exact reason I want to open a park, because mine won’t be dirty.”

Walt Disney created a culture that communicates excellence to every person who visits their parks.

Did you know that you cannot go more than 27 feet at Disney without passing a trash can. That is culture, my friends.

Danny Franks, the connections pastor at the Summit Church records the story of a pastor who wanted to try out how strong the culture was at Disney. The pastor dropped an apple core just to see how long it would take an employee to pick it up. 60 seconds, and it was not a custodian, it was a regular worker.

My point is that everything communicates and speaks. Be professional. Be clean. Be friendly. Be helpful.

Communicate something positive to every person who comes through your doors every weekend.

2. Make Connections Personal

Greeters must get deeper than “welcome to church,” “enjoy the service,” “how are you?”

These are not personal connections.

Most people who attend church are looking for friends. That is why they say that it is easier to step into community than conversion.

Every person at your church who has to interact with people should be challenged to make every connection personal.

3. Positions Are A Means To An End

We schedule all of our volunteers, we use a system called Planning Center (I highly recommend it)

Every position is important, but the position in and of itself is not the end. Helping people find and follow Jesus is the end.

So, every position that we create helps people find and follow Jesus.

Positions are a means to end, they are not the end.

So, we tell our volunteers who greet, park cars, or help kids get checked in that they are making a difference and helping us accomplish the end which is helping people find and follow Jesus.

4. Set Them Up For A Second Visit

Usually the idea of follow-up or a guest coming back as a second time is on the Pastor. Church members rely so heavily on the pastor making these things happen.

But what do you do when your church gets so big that Pastors cannot effectively make personal connections and set them up for a second visit?

That is where volunteers come in. We value volunteers making personal connections and helping people come back for a second visit.

Here is why this is important:

Statistics say that 16% guests who visit your church will come back for a second week.

A more staggering statistic says that 87% of second time guests return for a third visit.

Do you know what those statistics tell me? The second visit is extremely important, in some ways much more important than the first visit.

If you can be effective at getting first time guests to return for a second visit then your church will grow, because it is much easier to get them to a third visit than a second visit.

These are just a few of the things that we try to tell our connections team.

What are some values that you would add to the list?

 

 

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